News At Larson Studios!

Baskets Link  Baskets

"Larson Studios
pulls off an audio slam dunk for FX's Baskets"
Great new article in "Post Perspectives"
by Jennifer Walden
http://postperspective.com/larson-studios-pulls-off-an-audio-post-slam-dunk-for-fxs-baskets/
by Jennifer Walden
Sound & Picture Documentary Now!

Picture Editor Micah Gardner assembles a detailed mocumentary anthology with the Larson Studios sound team.
by Jennifer Walden
http://www.soundandpicture-digital.com/soundandpicture/issue_2_2016?pg=NaN#pgNaN
Rick and Allen in Stage 10 Fix It In Post

Rick Larson and Allan Falk  team up and talk about how to find the best post houses for your production.

Rick Larson and Allan Falk in Exclusive Interviews!
Read More at the ProductionHUB!
Published on Tuesday, October 06, 2015 at 10:17 AM
Stage 10 ICON Console
Larson Studios Stage 10!
Post Haste Digital Forms Strategic Alliance with Larson Studios

Los Angeles, CA – Independent post-production facilities Post Haste Digital and Larson Studios have joined forces to extend audio and video post production services in West Los Angeles. As part of the arrangement, Hollywood-based Larson will operate the Main Stage in Post Haste’s Culver City facility, where the studio will service its Westside clients and also lend talent to Post Haste projects. Upcoming projects to be mixed in Larson’s new Stage 10 include Fox’s “re-boot” of the cult sci-fi series The X-Files.
Link to "Broadcasting and Cable" article


The Peoples Choice Awards Logo Peoples Choice Awards:

Favorite Dramedy
Orange Is the New Black 
Critics Choice Logo  Critics’ Choice TV Awards

BEST SUPPORTING ACTRESS IN A DRAMA SERIES
• Lorraine Toussaint – Orange Is the New Black (Netflix) *WINNER
   
  Larson Studios congratulates our friends at Orange is the New Black, Fargo, Key & Peele, Portlandia and It’s Always Sunny in Philadelphia on their Emmy Award nominations. It is an honor to be a part of your shows.

Please join us in congratulating
Larson Studios Re-recording Mixers Chris Philp, David Raines and Mark Server, and Production Mixer Mike Playfair on their Emmy Award nomination for Outstanding Sound Mixing for a Miniseries or Movie for Fargo.

Larson Studios
congratulates Frank Laratta, Kevin Buchholz, John Peccatiello, Skye Lewin, Jason Lawrence, Brent Planiden, Adam DeCoster and Andrew Morgado on their Emmy Award nomination for Outstanding Sound Editing for a Miniseries, Movie or Special for Fargo.

Just in:
Fargo has just been picked up for a second season!
Read more on our facebook page!
 
 
Orange is the New Black Show Link Key and Peele Show Link Portlandia Link It's Always Sunny Link Fargo Logo    
   
Congratulations ! ! !

42nd Annual Daytime Emmy Award
Craig Ferguson
Celebrity Name Game
Outstanding Game Show Host
Golden Globes Logo 2014 Golden Globes Nominees:

Best TV Series, Musical or Comedy
Orange is the New Black
Best Actress in a TV Series, Musical or Comedy
Taylor Schilling: Orange is the New Black
Best TV Movie or Mini-Series
Fargo
Best Actress in a Mini-Series or TV Movie
Alison Tolman: Fargo
Best Actor in a Mini-Series or TV Movie
Billy Bob Tornton: Fargo
Best Supporting Actress in a Series, Mini-Series, or TV Movie
Uzo Aduba: Orange is the new Black
Best Supporting Actor in a Series, Mini-Series, or TV Movie
Colin Hanks: Fargo
Golden Globes Winners:
Best TV Movie or Miniseries: Fargo

Best Performance By an Actor in a Miniseries or Motion Picture made for Television
Billy Bob Thornton: Fargo

(And a special
shout out to our friend Matt Bomer)
Best Performance by an Actor in a Supporting Role in a Series, Miniseries or Motion Picture made for Television
Matt Bomer: The Normal Heart
Writers Guild Logo 2014 Writers Guild Award Nominees:

COMEDY SERIES
Orange Is the New Black, Written by Stephen Falk, Sian Heder, Tara Herrmann, Sara Hess, Nick Jones, Jenji Kohan, Lauren Morelli, Alex Regnery, Hartley Voss; Netflix
EPISODIC COMEDY
“Landline” (New Girl), Written by Rob Rosell; Fox
“Low Self Esteem City” (Orange Is the New Black), Written by Nick Jones; Netflix
Producers Guild of America Announces Documentary Nominees
 

The Producers Guild 2015 Nominations:

The David L. Wolper Award for Outstanding Producer of Long-Form Television:
Fargo (FX)
Producers: Adam Bernstein, John Cameron, Ethan Coen, Joel Coen, Michael Frislev, Noah Hawley, Warren Littlefield, Chad Oakes, Kim Todd

The Danny Thomas Award for Outstanding Producer of Episodic Television, Comedy:
Orange Is The New Black (Netflix)
Producers: Mark A. Burley, Sara Hess, Jenji Kohan, Gary Lennon, Neri Tannenbaum, Michael Trim, Lisa I. Vinnecour

SAG Awards Logo and link 2014 SAG Awards Nominations
Television Programs:

Outstanding Performance by a Male Actor in a Television Movie or Miniseries
Billy Bob Thornton, “Fargo”

Outstanding Performance by a Female Actor in a Comedy Series
Uzo Aduba, “Orange is the New Black”

Outstanding Performance by an Ensemble in a Comedy Series
“Orange is the New Black”

AFI Awards Link

AFI Awards:

The American Film Institute is out with its annual unranked list of the best movies and TV shows of the year, which it calls “culturally and artistically representative of the year’s most significant achievements in the art of the moving image.” . . .

On the TV side, five of the AFI’s 10 choices are freshman series: ABC’s How To Get Away With Murder, the CW’s Jane The Virgin, Cinemax’s The Knick, HBO’s Silicon Valley and Amazon’s Transparent. Also making the cut are FX’s Fargo and The Americans, HBO’s Game Of Thrones, Netflix’s Orange Is The New Black and AMC’s Mad Men.
“We celebrate these films and television programs as more than just milestones in a year of excellence.” AFI President and CEO Bob Gazzale said. “They are a part of our American cultural heritage – collectively, a new chapter in the story of the art form and of our nation.”

CAS Logo link Cinema Audio Society (CAS) Nomination

TELEVISION MOVIE or MINI-SERIES
Fargo: Part 2 - The Rooster Prince
Production Mixer:   Michael Playfair, CAS
Re-recording Mixer:   David Raines, CAS
Re-recording Mixer:  Mark Server
ADR Mixer:  Andrew Morgado
   
Rick Ash  Rick Ash

Emmy Award winning re-recording mixer
Rick Ash has joined Larson Studios. Rick and his mix partner Mark Server are currently mixing FOX's Cult favorite The X Files as well as AMC’s hit western series Hell on Wheels. The two recently completed mixing the ten episode FX mini-series Fargo at Larson Studios in May, and will be responsible for mixing the upcoming series The Returned for A+E this fall.Rick joins Larson Studios’ award winning team of re-recording mixers Chris Philp, Josh Schneider, Sherry Klein, Fred Howard, Jamie Santos, Ken Novak, John Chamberlin and Chris Haire.

Hell on Wheels Poster/ link  Fargo Poster/ link The X Files
2014 Critics Choice Awards Winner:
Fargo

O
Larson Studios 2014 Emmys Nominations!

Larson Studios congratulates our friends at Orange is the New Black, Fargo, Key & Peele, Portlandia and It’s Always Sunny in Philadelphia on their Emmy Award nominations. It is an honor to be a part of your shows.

Please join us in congratulating
Larson Studios Re-recording Mixers Chris Philp, David Raines and Mark Server, and Production Mixer Mike Playfair on their Emmy Award nomination for Outstanding Sound Mixing for a Miniseries or Movie for Fargo.

Larson Studios
congratulates Frank Laratta, Kevin Buchholz, John Peccatiello, Skye Lewin, Jason Lawrence, Brent Planiden, Adam DeCoster and Andrew Morgado on their Emmy Award nomination for Outstanding Sound Editing for a Miniseries, Movie or Special for
Fargo.

Just in:
Fargo has just been picked up for a second season!
Read more on our facebook page! 

 Orange is the New Black Show Link Key and Peele Show Link Portlandia Link It's Always Sunny Link Fargo Logo     Larson Studios facebook link icon

 

Recent Press

In the July 2014 issue of Post Magazine:

Check out the article on page 35, "Audio For Web Series &  Shorts"  featuring  the Emmy Nominated  Orange Is the New Black.
The article features our very own John Kincade, Chris Philp, and John Chamberlin.
Also mentioned, Dialogue editor Todd Niesen, Sound effects editor/sound designer John Peccatiello, ADR/Foley mixer Andrew Morgado, and Foley artist Adam DeCoster.



 


Also; In the July 2013 issue of Post Magazine:
Larson Studios and Arrested Development

By: Jennifer Walden
Arrested Development Image
There are so many variables in mixing a Web series. It’s not an easy job. There are no set guidelines for levels. There are no set guidelines for encoding the audio — something the mixer has no control over. You spend tons of time getting a mix perfect and then it gets squashed during the encoding process. Frustrating!

Viewers listen to playback on everything... from home theater 5.1 set-ups to iPhone speakers. For these true audio pros, it never comes down to, “Oh, this is just a Web series. It’s no big deal.” They bring their A game (and A studio) to every show, despite time crunches, despite budget constraints, and in the face of so many unknowns. 

ARRESTED DEVELOPMENT

Supervising sound editor Kevin W. Buchholz recently completed Season 4 of Arrested Development, now available on Netflix. His audio team includes re-recording mixers Sherry Klein and Alexey Mohr at Larson Studios (www.larson.com) in Hollywood.

Larson offers nine dub stages split between two locations, a facility on Sunset Blvd. and their Wilcox Ave. location, which is only two blocks away. Arrested Development was mixed in both locations. As a full-service audio post facility, Larson Studios offers 7.1 mixing, sound design, Foley, ADR, dialog editorial and everything in between. 



Arrested Development, created by Mitch Hurwitz, is now a Web series. All 15 episodes were made available on Netflix the same day. Keeping the sound consistent across all 15 episodes, from the mix levels to the details in the ambience, was absolutely necessary because viewers can jump from episode to episode, or watch all the episodes back to back. 

To maintain a consistent level, re-recording mixer Klein, who handled the dialog and music for 10 episodes, set a -23 dB dialog norm for everyone to adhere to. “We had no broadcast constraints in terms of what our dialog norms had to be, so that was what we used to maintain levels. The biggest challenge in the beginning was figuring out how we were going to make all this play at once, knowing that people were going to jump around.”
 
The show is mixed in 5.1, much like a typical network show, but Buchholz notes that since Netflix content is streaming and there are no broadcast processing treatments, the team had the freedom to create a dynamic mix that best conveyed the story. Re-recording mixer Mohr handled the sound effects on four episodes. “The best opportunity of the delivery medium was having that freedom and confidence that as you crafted it, so shall it play,” he says. “That is really a wonderful treat; you’re not doing something that you hope will hit the broadcast treatment in a favorable way. The mix will play exactly as you built it. We love Netflix. We love streaming. We’re happy for the future.”

When viewers are watching on their smart phones, tablets or laptops, they’ll probably be listening over headphones. Mohr feels a headphone mix enables them to play sounds at a more subtle level and still be confident the details in the effects will come through. “Arrested Development has many layers to the onion and is clearly designed to be re-watched and reconsidered. One episode is relative to the next. Mixing for headphones affords us the ability to keep sound effects in a lower pocket and still feel confident that the joke will play and people will still understand what they’re seeing.” 

He also notes that a good mix is a good mix that will translate on any number of playback systems, provided the mix is delivered the way it was created. Since the show isn’t going through any broadcast processing, “we could craft something that’s going to sound good on a large number of playback systems, including headphones.”

Now that Arrested Development is a Web series, the show’s runtimes are longer. For broadcast, a half-hour show is about 22 minutes, making time for commercial breaks. With no breaks to account for, the episodes in Season 4 are 28-38 minutes long. Mohr notes the content is also more dense. “The jokes come quickly. The call backs are frequent. The cuts are frequent. The storytelling is very involved and deep.” 

According to Buchholz, “Arrested Development has stories coming together in realtime and being told from different perspectives.” He was able to recall scenes from prior episodes, and export elements from those scene to the mixers for use in the current episode. To achieve this, Buchholz kept a master session that included all the completed episodes. He updated his master session every time an episode wrapped. “The only way I could keep track of these nexuses as we called them — these areas where the stories would all overlap — was to take the finished mix sessions and copy them into one master session. I always had a copy of all the final mix sessions with me in one master mix session.” 

In addition to Klein and Mohr, many other mixers worked on the show, including Lisle Engle (six episodes), Josh Schneider (four episodes), Jamie Santos (five episodes) and Chris Philp (one episode). Having a master session proved invaluable. When a scene was recalled from a previous episode, Buchholz had the exact elements that were already established for that scene. “As the story is being told, it’s the exact same point in time, so it was important that we had the exact elements.” 

He was the thread that held the audio team together. No matter who was in the mix chairs, he was able to provide them with the correct elements in a coherent way. 

Mohr notes that with Pro Tools 10, Buchholz could export a selected series of tracks that were spotted to the new position in the current episode. “For Kevin [Buchholz] to have the forethought to have all those sessions in one, and then to have this ability in Pro Tools 10 to quickly fly these precise sound effects builds out as needed, was a great thing that accelerated our workflow and kept things moving smoothly.”

Buchholz notes that creator Mitch Hurwitz spends a lot of time getting the dialog right, from performances to placement. So he and his audio team did everything they could to preserve production sound. 

Buchholz worked with dialog editors Shannon Beaumont and Todd Niesen to pull words and syllables from out takes and other places in the dialog. “For the entire series, there was only five or six times we needed to use ADR to replace a line due to wind or noise or some other technical issue,” explains Buchholz. 

On the mix stage, Klein recalls constantly moving lines of dialog and voiceover to make sure all the jokes were coming through. “We’d try moving the dialog two frames to the left, or two frames to the right, or overlaying it with the VO to make a point,” she says. “It was all about getting the jokes available to everybody that was watching. Whether it was the first pass, second pass or third pass, if you watch that show a couple of times, you will get them all. They will uncover.” 

The music is another key element to the comedy. It’s not just a series of cues — it acts as a character. Music editor Jason Newman and composer David Schwartz worked closely with Hurwitz to craft the music tracks. Mixing the dialog and music, Klein was constantly aware of the music placement, the levels, and how the music and the dialog interacted with the effects because it was part of the comedy. 

Buchholz adds, “The challenge was in making sure the voiceover hits where it needs to, the dialog hits where it needs to, and that the jokes embedded in the music hit where they need to. It’s a delicate balance of these elements that are fighting for the spotlight.”



For each episode, Buchholz spent five to seven days working with the audio team on the Foley (Adam DeCoster, Tom Kilzer, Andrew Morgado), sound effects (Lisle Engle, Bob Arons), dialog edit (Shannon Beaumont, Todd Niesen), ADR (Nate Poptic, Dana Olsefsky, Greg Stacy, Kim Lowe) and music edit (Jason Newman). The re-recording mixers spent two days per episode on the final 5.1 mix. 

For Mohr, having an entire season, all 15 episodes, play back seamlessly is a testament to the broad team of people involved with the project. Even with all the different mixers and different audio editors who worked on the series, there is still a consistent sound. 

According to Mohr, if you watch the entire season straight through, you wouldn’t notice the change in the mixers or editors. A contributing factor to the consistent sound is that everything was done at Larson Studios. “It’s a wonderful mix facility. It has multiple mix stages that are all equipped with the same gear and have the same capabilities. That affords us the ability to not only move talent around, but also have confidence that everything is going to work the same way. What we hear is going to be the same. We are going to get the same results and everything will playback the same way in every room.” 

Klein, who worked on the original series years ago, feels that mixing Season 4 of Arrested Development is a highlight in her long career. Not only were the mix sessions full of rewarding challenges but at the end of it all, the episodes play back exactly as they were mixed. “The fact that they were streamed with Netflix, and that we didn’t have to go through any broadcast network made it more rewarding at the end. We didn’t have to watch that first broadcast and go, ‘What did they do to our mix?’ With streaming, it allows us the bandwidth and capability to actually air our mixes as we mixed them.”